Magic City Morning Star

Advertising | RSS Feed | About Us 

Last Updated: Jan 24, 2016 - 1:20:17 AM 

An eclectic mix of news and information
Staff Login
Donate towards our web hosting bill!

Front Page 
  News
  -- Local
  -- State
  -- National
  Community
  Business
  -- IRS News
  -- Win at Work
  Education
  -- History
  Tech Notes
  Entertainment
  -- Comics
  International
  -- R.P. BenDedek
  -- Kenneth Tellis
  Outdoors
  Sports
  Features
  -- M Stevens-David
  -- Down the Road
  Christianity
  Today in History
  Opinion
  -- Editor's Desk
  -- Guest Column
  -- Scheme of Things
  -- Michael Devolin
  -- Tom DeWeese
  -- Ed Feulner
  -- Jim Kouri
  -- Julie Smithson
  -- J. Grant Swank
  -- Doug Wrenn
  Letters
  Agenda 21
  Book Reviews
  -- Old Embers
  Notices
  Archive
  Discontinued


Web Directory Reviews
WDR Directory of Directories
Restore The Republic - The Home of the Freedom Movement!

Book Reviews

Milt Gross Book Review: "Night and Day" by the late Robert Parker
By Milton M. Gross
Jan 24, 2016 - 1:20:02 AM

Email this article
 Printer friendly page

This book by the late Robert Parker is as good as the rest, which means pretty darn good. He's been my favorite mystery writer since just before I remember. Can't remember when that was. Milt Gross photo.
This latest Robert Parker book I've read is like the rest, fast, good writing, fast plot, and lots of action.

"...asked how his books would be viewed in 50 years, replied: "Don't know, don't care." He was proud of his work, but he mainly saw writing as a means of providing a comfortable life for his family," from Wikepedia.

"That's how I feel about writing, only, in my case, my "family," consisting of Dolores, the Kat, and me, would starve had we had no place to live without depending on writing to pay for it.

Like all Parker books, Night and Day is fast, plot easy to understand, and a number of "wise guy" type comments. My kind of book.

This is one of seven Jesse Stone novels, set in a small coast town northeast of Boston, Paradise, MA. A woman school principal, Betsy Ingersoll, checks under her students' dresses at the beginning of the tale. Her husband is a high- powered attorney, who, of course, urges, threatens, and in other ways tries to get Stone, the police chief, to "lay off" his wife, after Stone begins to investigate her actions.

There is also "The Night Hawk," whose passion is photographing naked women in their 30s and 40s in their own homes, without touching or hurting them in any way.

Based on notes he sends to Stone, the Night Hawk threatens to do more harm to the ladies he photographs, and, of course, "It's up to Jesse to catch the Night Hawk, before it's too late," states the book cover.

"I think it bodes well," says one character as the story ends as happily ever after as Jesse Stone stories do.

Copyrighted in 2009 by the late author, it is published by the Penguin Group, New York and other locations with a price on the cover of $25.95. Amazon.com lists it for $9.99 in paperback and $2.25 new.

"Robert Brown Parker (September 17, 1932 -- January 18, 2010) was an American crime writer. His most famous works were the 40 novels written about the private detective Spenser. ABC television network developed the television series Spenser: for Hire based on the character in the mid-1980s; a series of TV movies based on the character were also produced. His works incorporate encyclopedic knowledge of the Boston metropolitan area. The Spenser novels have been cited by critics and bestselling authors such as Robert Crais, Harian Coben, and Dennis Lahane as not only influencing their own work but reviving and changing the detective genre. Parker also wrote 2 other series based on an individual character. He wrote 9 novels based on the character Jesse Stone and 6 novels based on the character Sunny Randall," according to Wikepedia.

"Parker was born in Springfield, MA. In 1956 Parker married Joan H. Parker, whom he claimed to have met as a toddler at a birthday party. They spent their childhoods in the same neighborhood.

"After earning a BA degree from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, Parker served as a soldier in the U.S. Army Infantry in Korea. In 1957, he earned his Master's degree in English literature from Boston University and then worked in advertising and technical writing until 1962. Parker received a PhD in English literature from Boston University in 1971.

"Parker wrote his first novel in 1971 while at Northeastern University. He became a full professor in 1976, and turned to full-time writing in 1979 with five Spenser novels to his credit," states Wikepedia.

Parker passed away while writing at his desk in 2010.

Night and Day is of the same high quality story telling as are all his books.

If you have enjoyed other Parker books or want to try him for the first time, grab yourself a copy somewhere, settle down in a comfortable easy chair, and go at it.


Milt Gross can be reached for corrections, harassment, or other purposes at lesstraveledway@roadrunner.com.

Milton M. Gross Copyright 2015


© Copyright 2002-2014 by Magic City Morning Star

Top of Page

Book Reviews
Latest Headlines
Milt Gross Book Review: "The Devil Wins" by Reed Farrel Coleman for the late Robert Parker
Martha Stevens-David Review: "White Ashes" by John D. Moulton
Milt Gross Book Review: "A" is for Alibi by Sue Grafton
Milt Gross Book Review: "Night and Day" by the late Robert Parker
Milt Gross Book Review: "The Bazaar of Bad Dreams" by Stephen King

A Dinosaur of Education - a blog by James Fabiano.
Shobe Studios
Wysong Foods - Pets and People Too

Google
 
Web magic-city-news.com